Oil

DAPL moves forward

The Acting Secretary of the Army has granted the easement necessary to finish the billion-dollar project.

 

This story was originally  and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

The is in the final process of getting approvals to complete construction across the Missouri river, according to North Dakota senator John Hoeven.

The Acting Secretary of the Army has directed the Army Corps of Engineers to proceed with an easement necessary to finish the pipeline, Don Canton, spokesman for Hoeven, told the Associated Press. The easement “isn’t quite issued yet, but they plan to approve it” within days, he added.

Construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota was halted in early December after a permit for a crucial section was denied by the Army Corps of Engineers.

A spokesman for the U.S. army did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Jan Hasselman, a lawyer representing the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, cautioned in an email that the battle wasn’t over. “People are jumping the gun, no easement has been issued,” he said, adding that he had confirmed that with the justice department.

But Hasselman added: “I’d say it’s a near certainty that they go ahead. It will be illegal of them to do so, of course, so (we) will have to litigate that.”

The Standing Rock tribe, supported by indigenous activists and environmental groups across the globe, has long argued that the $3.8-billion project threatens sacred lands and the regional water supply.

In his first week in office, Trump demanding the revival of the Dakota Access pipeline and the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, both of which Barack Obama had halted. The , which it and not backed by proper consultation with Standing Rock.

Though many activists left Standing Rock after the Obama administration in December, some have remained camped out by the construction site through the .

Obama’s decision directed the government to conduct a full environmental review of the project, known as an environmental impact statement (EIS), which is a process that the tribe has long demanded.

In a released on Tuesday night, the tribe said it would “vigorously pursue legal action to ensure the environmental impact statement order issued late last year is followed so the pipeline process is legal, fair and accurate.”

On Jan. 18, the army filed a to complete the EIS for the Missouri river crossing. That process can take years, and was expected to significantly delay a final decision on the permit.

“The army corps lacks statutory authority to simply stop the EIS and issue the easement,” the tribe said on Tuesday. “To abandon the EIS would amount to a wholly unexplained and arbitrary change based on the president’s personal views and, potentially, personal investments.”

Hoeven’s statement comes just one day after a government attorney told a federal judge that he could not provide an estimate of when the army corps would act on Trump’s executive order.

“The corps and the army are continuing to make decisions under the order,” attorney Matthew Marinelli told Judge James Boasberg during a hearing on Monday, according to . Boasberg is presiding over litigation between the tribe, the pipeline company and the government.

“I can’t give you a timetable for the completion of that decision-making process,” Marinelli added.

The next court hearing is scheduled for Feb. 6. Marinelli did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Irina Lukban, a 22-year-old activist who is at Standing Rock, said that word about the easement had not spread through camp yet on Tuesday night.

“It’s not too surprising, but it’s still really upsetting, especially with all the other tensions rising with the immigration ban,” she said, referencing .

“We can’t give up. We can’t lose hope,” she added. “The resistance is still alive.”

Xhopakelxhit, a member of the Nuu Chah Nulth, Coast Salish, and Cree who spent months at Standing Rock, said she didn’t know if there would be enough people to try to stop the pipeline construction, since tribal leaders have

But she added: “People are strong. People are firm. I don’t think people are going to stop fighting.”

Trump’s speedy effort to approve the pipeline was not surprising, she said. “It proves that America really is a giant corporation. I feel like these next four years are going to be really difficult.”

NewTowncarShare News Classifieds
  • Background: The Birds of Prey NCA Partnership is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in Boise, Idaho, which was established in 2015 after in-depth stakeholder input...
  • Southwest Borderlands Initiative Professor of Native Americans and the News Media The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University is...
  • AWF seeks an energetic Marketing and Communications Director. Please see the full job description at https://azwildlife.org/jobs
  • The Southwest Communications Director will be responsible for working with field staff in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico to develop and execute detailed communication plans...
  • An intentional community designed for aging in place. Green built with Pumice-crete construction (R32), bamboo flooring, pine doors, T&G ceiling with fans, and maintenance free...
  • (CFROG) is a Ventura County, CA based watch-dog and advocacy non-profit organization. cfrog.org
  • Take your journalism skills to the next level and deepen your understanding of environmental issues by applying for the 2019-2020 Ted Scripps Fellowships in Environmental...
  • WINTER WILDLANDS ALLIANCE POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT: EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Winter Wildlands Alliance seeks an experienced and highly motivated individual to lead and manage the organization as Executive...
  • The San Juan Mountains Association is seeking a visionary leader to spearhead its public lands stewardship program in southwest Colorado. For a detailed job description...
  • The Cascade Forest Conservancy seeks a passionate ED to lead our forest protection, conservation, education, and advocacy programs.
  • Mountain Pursuit is a new, bold, innovative, western states, hunting advocacy nonprofit headquartered in Jackson, Wyoming. We need a courageous, hard working, passionate Executive Director...
  • The Draper Natural History Museum (DNHM) at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center of the West in Cody, WY, invites applications for the Willis McDonald, IV...
  • Couple seeks quiet, private, off-grid acreage in area with no/low cell phone service and no/low snowfall. Conservation/bordering public lands a plus. CA, OR, WA, ID,...
  • 20mi N of Steamboat Springs, majestic views, aspen forest, year-round access, yurt, septic, solar electric, seasonal ponds, no covenants, bordering National Forest. Ag status. $449K....
  • Conservation nonprofit Friends of Cedar Mesa in Bluff, Utah is hiring for two positions: Communications & Development Manager/Director (remote work possible) and a Deputy Director...
  • Former northern Sierra winery, with 2208 sq.ft. commercial building, big lot, room to expand.
  • The dZi Foundation is seeking a FT Communications Associate with a passion for Nepal to join our team in Ridgway, Colorado. Visit dzi.org/careers.
  • Available now for site conservator, property manager. View resume at http://skills.ojaidigital.net.
  • Stellar seed-saving NGO is available to serious partner. Package must include financial support. Details: http://seeds.ojaidigital.net.
  • 1400 sf of habitable space in a custom-designed eco-home created and completed by a published L.A. architect in 1997-99. Nestled within its own 80-acre mountain...