Your guide to the solar eclipse

Totality, traffic, telescopes: How ready are you for the event of the century?

 

On Aug. 21 in the West, a total solar eclipse will pass over Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming and a tiny sliver in Montana. It’s been almost 100 years since a full eclipse swept coast-to-coast within the continental U.S. You’ll have to be in a 70-mile-wide band called the “path of totality”— and wade through hordes of gawkers — to see it, and that won’t be easy. So we’ve put together a little guide to help you find your way.

Start here!

Are you in the path of totality?

Heck yes!

No

But do you have a

nice view of the sky?

Yep, I’m cool like that

(brushes off shoulder).

No, there’s a stupid

building in the way.

You’re set! Now…

How does a vacation sound?

Sounds good!

Not a good time.

Find a viewing party

near you. Listings

by state are

and more events

listed .

Yeah!

Solar glasses: Get a

Bonus

points for 1980s retro.

How about

a night out?

 

 

Into camping?

Know what time the

eclipse will happen

and for how long from

your vantage point.

.

Nah, I’ll stay in.

My tent’s already

at the door!

Not this time.

Do you have a

solar telescope?

No.

Yes!

Hurry! Public

camping spaces are

limited, though

federal land agencies

are creating more

options. In Oregon,

the Forest Service

has

through-

out the state. The

Bureau of Land

Management has a

. And

the National Park

Service has a

to watch

the eclipse.

Get a hotel. Bookings

are limited, but here

are a few last-minute

options to check out:

First, a guide to all

of the

(plus how long the

eclipse will last in

each place);

; tips to

;

if price isn’t

a problem — and

.

Are clouds going to

ruin your view?

Check this historical

,

which provides

average August cloud

cover on the eclipse

track. On the days

leading up to the

eclipse, check this

eclipse cloud

.

Create a pin-hole

viewer that will

project the eclipse

no matter where you

are.

. Or — view

the eclipse with

something you

probably already

have at home:

.

Phew! All good.

Gulp. Clouds

are rollin’ in!

Sweet!

Seems weird.

I don’t want to.

Beware! Expect

two- to four-hour

traffic delays

within the eclipse

path. Allow your-

self extra travel

time — unless you

don’t mind

watching the

eclipse from

the back of your

truck or hood of

your car.

Check out photos of

the eclipse:

#HCNsolareclipse

 

from your

computer, thanks to

NASA.

Bonus: During the

eclipse, pay attention

to birds and

.

You’re ready! Sit back, and get ready to play Pink Floyd’s

Bonnie Tyler’s or maybe

Bonnie Prince Billy’s

.

By Paige Blankenbuehler and Brooke Warren | Photos: Anton Bielousov/Wikimedia Commons, By sancho_panza/Wikimedia Commons, BBC,

Where are you heading for the solar eclipse? Tell us — and we’ll add your destination to our map.

Note: This story has been updated.

Paige Blankenbuehler is an assistant editor at NewTowncarShare News.

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