Why marriage equality is a matter of tribal sovereignty

More tribal nations are returning to traditional views that accept and honor LGBTQ members.

 

Indian Country News is a weekly note from NewTowncarShare News, as we continue to broaden our coverage of tribal affairs across the West.

Alray Nelson has been campaigning for years for the right to marry the man he loves. Nelson, a member of the Navajo Nation, has been working with his nonprofit, , to educate tribal council members and citizens about the need for marriage equality on the reservation. When he speaks to people living there, young and old, Nelson, who is 32, told me he generally finds Navajos to be accepting of LGBTQ individuals. However, the tribal council, which in 2005 , is the biggest roadblock between him and equal rights.

Nelson said a recent president of the Navajo Nation told him gay and lesbian couples should leave the reservation because he thought marriage equality was a “white man’s way of thinking.” But as Nelson put it, most tribal nations that hes aware of , and in many cases , LGBTQ members. In fact, for the Navajos, the , a complex gender identification, are a . It was the that then created the .

“Point period: It’s wrong for anyone, whether a young person or an elder, to think LGBTQ is not traditional,” Nelson said. “We were getting married long before Stonewall had happened in New York City,” he said, referencing the 1969 uprising against homophobic police brutality. “We were recognizing the rights of LGBTQ and trans men and women in our communities, and we were holding them as sacred beings.”

Nelson said he is not aware of a tribe that did not traditionally accept LGBTQ members. However, among the 567 federally recognized tribes in the United States, he and his colleagues count only 35 that recognize same-sex marriage.

Participants in the 35th Native Community Connections parade in Phoenix, Arizona, show their LGBTQ pride.

As marriage equality continues to gain acceptance across the country, tribal nations that refuse to recognize same sex marriages will find themselves increasingly at odds with state and federal laws, as well as popular opinion, which could present a danger to sovereignty. As law professor : “tribal sovereignty remains precarious,” and the longer tribes enact same-sex marriage bans “the higher the likelihood that they will negatively impact perceptions of tribes and tribal justice. Historically, when tribal and Anglo-American values were in conflict, non-Indians tended to disparage tribal values as backwards, inferior, and unjust.”

This was certainly the case when my tribe, the Cherokee Nation, revoked the citizenship of the Freedmen, the descendants of black slaves once held by Cherokees. The move was widely condemned as a civil rights violation, and it spurred and even . The Cherokee Freedmen eventually won in court

have seen under the Trump administration, and Nelson argues that tribes should instead assert their sovereign authority . “Use our sovereignty as a way to protect our people,” he said.

But while LGBTQ Navajo Nation employees who are paid through federal grants have workplace discrimination protections, the tribe has no laws protecting the rest. And that can have dire consequences. A found transgender Navajos felt not only misunderstood by their own people and subject to higher than average rates of violence, but also that violence against them is tolerated.

“It’s very clear that if you identify as trans, especially if you’re a Navajo trans woman living here on the reservation, it’s more likely youre going to see violence within your lifetime because it’s become so normalized and it’s an issue that no one is really talking about,” Nelson told me.

The continued legacy of colonialism, a tragic but very real part of this countrys history, leaves Indigenous peoples experiencing higher rates of violence, trauma, abuse, and a variety of negative health consequences. . One study found among Native Americans who identify as , a distinction often used to describe several gender identifications, 78 percent of female-identified respondents “reported being physically assaulted in their lifetime,” and 85 percent “reported being sexually assaulted in their lifetime.”

As Native peoples who are constantly asking the broader country to recognize and respect our unique and important histories and cultures, it hardly seems appropriate to use our sovereign authority to discriminate against our own.

Wado.

Graham Lee Brewer is a contributing editor at NewTowncarShare News and a member of the Cherokee Nation.

NewTowncarShare News Classifieds
  • Borderlands Restoration, L3c is the founding organization of the Borderlands Restoration Network. Borderlands Restoration Network (BRN) is both an independent public charity and a collaborative...
  • Assistant Editor, NewTowncarShare News, Telecommute. Edit, write and help shape digital strategy for one of the best magazines in the country. Committed to inclusivity....
  • Associate Editor, West-north Desk, NewTowncarShare News, Telecommute. Dream job. Write, edit and contribute to the vision and strategy of one of the best magazines...
  • Take over the reins of a dynamic grassroots social justice group that protects Montana's water quality, family farms and ranches, & unique quality of life....
  • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR - Winter Wildlands Alliance seeks an experienced and highly motivated individual to lead and manage the organization as Executive Director. Visit https://winterwildlands.org/executive-director-search/ for...
  • Background: The Birds of Prey NCA Partnership is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in Boise, Idaho, which was established in 2015 after in-depth stakeholder input...
  • Southwest Borderlands Initiative Professor of Native Americans and the News Media The Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University is...
  • AWF seeks an energetic Marketing and Communications Director. Please see the full job description at https://azwildlife.org/jobs
  • The Southwest Communications Director will be responsible for working with field staff in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico to develop and execute detailed communication plans...
  • An intentional community designed for aging in place. Green built with Pumice-crete construction (R32), bamboo flooring, pine doors, T&G ceiling with fans, and maintenance free...
  • (CFROG) is a Ventura County, CA based watch-dog and advocacy non-profit organization. cfrog.org
  • Take your journalism skills to the next level and deepen your understanding of environmental issues by applying for the 2019-2020 Ted Scripps Fellowships in Environmental...
  • The San Juan Mountains Association is seeking a visionary leader to spearhead its public lands stewardship program in southwest Colorado. For a detailed job description...
  • The Cascade Forest Conservancy seeks a passionate ED to lead our forest protection, conservation, education, and advocacy programs.
  • Mountain Pursuit is a new, bold, innovative, western states, hunting advocacy nonprofit headquartered in Jackson, Wyoming. We need a courageous, hard working, passionate Executive Director...
  • The Draper Natural History Museum (DNHM) at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center of the West in Cody, WY, invites applications for the Willis McDonald, IV...
  • Couple seeks quiet, private, off-grid acreage in area with no/low cell phone service and no/low snowfall. Conservation/bordering public lands a plus. CA, OR, WA, ID,...
  • Former northern Sierra winery, with 2208 sq.ft. commercial building, big lot, room to expand.
  • The dZi Foundation is seeking a FT Communications Associate with a passion for Nepal to join our team in Ridgway, Colorado. Visit dzi.org/careers.
  • Available now for site conservator, property manager. View resume at http://skills.ojaidigital.net.